terça-feira, 20 de junho de 2017

The Kohinoor: Following the bloodiest diamond across history | india | Hindustan Times


Koh-i-Noor diamond_montanha de luz
"I’ve been told that the Koh-i-Noor diamond wasn’t cut
and polished until quite late in its history, yet it was always a diamond. If
you had seen it before it was cut and thought it was just another ugly rock,
that would be a wrong view. Now that it has been cut, it’s easy to recognize
– it’s one of the most famous diamonds in the world – to this day, India and
Pakistan whine about how the British stole it from the Sikhs in the 19th
century. But the point here is that whatever it looked like before it was cut
and polished,[em 1852] it was still the famous Koh-i-Noor diamond, and that it was a
diamond long before it was ever called the Koh-i-Noor. So, to have assumed
it was just a lump of rock would have been a wrong view." Dzongsar Khyentse




The Kohinoor: Following the bloodiest diamond across history | india | Hindustan Times

 It’s a stone that, legend says, should only be worn by a woman or a god; to a man who dares wear it, it will only bring bad luck.
On April 18 2017, during a court hearing on a suit seeking the diamond’s return to India, Ranjit Kumar, the Solicitor General said that the rock, whose name means ‘mountain of light’, was not stolen by the UK, but was given to them by the Sikh king Ranjit Singh.
1849:
The British win the second Anglo-Sikh War and annexe the Sikh kingdom of Punjab under the Treaty of Lahore. 11-year-old Duleep Singh signs over the kingdom and the diamond over to them before stepping down from his throne.
Article III of the treaty reads: The gem called the KohiNoor, which was taken from Shah Sooja-ool-moolk by Maharajah Runjeet Singh, shall be surrendered by the Maharajah of Lahore to the Queen of England.
1852:
The diamond is taken to England and showcased to the public. However, after reports of ‘disappointment’ with the stone’s uncut appearance, Queen Victoria’s husband, Prince Albert orders the polishing of the Kohinoor. The final product, which takes 38 days to achieve, shaves off significant portions of the stone, reducing its weight by 42% -- from 186 carats (or 37.2 g) to its current 105.6 carats (21.12 g).
Bearing in mind the myth surrounding the stone, Queen Victoria later asks in her will that the Kohinoor only be worn by a female queen.
The stone is then added to the crowns of her successors and is stowed away in the Tower of London where it has been ever since.
Ever since:
Despite claims of ownership by four countries -- India, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Britain -- the United Kingdom has maintained its ownership over the gem.